Floods compromise existing termite barriers

    

As if Queenslanders didn’t have enough to worry about after the multitude of floods over the past couple of years: now we’ve discovered that properties hit by the floods have become even more susceptible to termite infestations.

We’ve been advised by our chemical partners that if floodwaters enter a property where a termite barrier has be placed in the past 10 years, the soil erosion caused by the water compromises the termite control system.

What that means: properties affected by floods will require a full retreatment if they are to be protected from termites.

One of my technical colleagues, Simon Lean, puts it a little more eloquently:

“If your home has been affected by floods in the past two years, even if you have previously had a termite treatment, your home may no longer be protected. Flood waters can affect termite chemical soil barriers by physically removing treated soil away from the structure and depositing untreated soil and debris in its place. This can enable termites to bridge or breach and gain access to the home.”

We know this is just another bill to be paid on top of cleaning, repairs and replacement of furniture. But we also know the damage termites can cause and if it’s one thing Queenslanders can do without it’s more damage.

We’re offering a 25% discount to assist residents who have had to shoulder the financial burden of flood damage. This is on average $600* per home in the affected areas for re-treatment and also for first-time treatments.

We hope this offer, open to residents in flood-affected areas, can help homeowners who either require first-time treatment or a refresh on previous treatments to protect their home.

If you’re in a flood-affected area and would like to speak with Rentokil about your individual situation, please call my Queensland colleagues on 1300 761 947.

The offer is valid until 30 September 2013. * The average cost of treating a home is approximately $2,500.  A 25% discount saves customers $625.

Do you have Biophilia, associated to plants?
What the moth? What is it about moths?
Comments
  1. adresyfirm.org

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

z